Economics vs Equity

Economics vs Equity

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The following consists of the complete season releases from for the Lincoln-Douglas value topic listed below. Upon purchase, you will have access to a ZIP file containing the material listed. Take note of the release dates, as the timing may conflict with arguments of the current year.

Resolved: In the realm of economics, freedom ought to be valued above equity.

Part I: Resolutional Articles
  • Just another Game of Monopoly
    • An Analysis of Economic Freedom
    • A Crash Course on Economic Freedom
    • How to Measure Economic Freedom
    • The Effect of Economic Freedom on Countries
    • Conclusion
    • Endnotes
  • Don’t be Negative about being Negative
    • Key Ideas for Negative
    • Meanings and Common Definitions
    • Values and Viewpoints
    • Support
    • Economics
    • Conclusion
  • The Why
    • Philosophic Core of the Resolution
    • Philosophers for the Affirmative
    • Philosophers for the Negative
    • Conclusion
  • A Valuable Workout
    • Strategic Value Argumentation
    • Unified Analysis
    • Multiple Values
    • Flex Negatives
    • Conclusion
  • Strategies
    • Case Strategies
    • Common Mistakes
    • Conclusion
  • Logical Chronology
    • Opponent’s Pre-value
    • Your Pre-value
    • Your Framework
    • Opponent’s Framework
    • Your Contentions
    • Opponent’s Contentions
Part II: Affirmative Cases
  • “Fun and Fancy Free”
  • Affirmative Case: Private Property Rights
  • Introduction
  • Criterion: Capitalism
  • Contention One: Freedom Leads to Increased Property Rights
  • Contention Two: Property Rights Support Economic Growth
  • Contention Three: Freedom Supports Equality
  • Conclusion
  • Affirmative Addendum: Private Property Rights
  • Negative Brief: Private Property Rights
  • Value and Criterion:
  • “The Land of the Free and Home of the Hard Working”
  • Affirmative Case: Responsibility
  • Introduction
  • Definitions
  • Resolutional Analysis: Ends and Means
  • Value: Individual Responsibility
  • Value link 1: Basics of Relationships
  • Value link 2: Morality Vital
  • Contention 1: Equity Erodes
  • Application: Cuba
  • Contention 2: Freedom Confirms
  • Application: Canada
  • Conclusion
  • Negative Brief: Responsibility
  • “Freedom Means Prosperity”
  • Affirmative Case: Prosperity
  • Introduction:
  • Scope of Debate:
  • Resolutional Analysis: Focused on Government
  • Value:
  • Contention 1: Equity Can Limit Free Enterprise
  • Contention 2: Free Enterprise is a Form of Economic Freedom
  • Conclusion:
  • Negative Brief
  • Definitions:
  • Scope of Debate:
  • Resolutional Analysis:
  • Value:
  • Criterion:
  • Contention 1:
  • Contention 2:
  • “Ah, it’s an Invisible Hand!”
  • Affirmative Case: National Security
  • Introduction:
  • Value:
  • Contention 1: Economic Freedom Improves Military Defense.
  • Contention 2: Economic Freedom Improves Economic Stability.
  • Conclusion:
  • Negative Brief
  • Value:
  • Contention 1:
  • Contention 2:
  • Work Cited
  • “The Price of Happiness”
  • Affirmative Case: Quality of Life
  • Resolutional Analysis: Equity is Net Worth
  • Value: Quality of Life
  • Contention 1: Freedom Promotes Quality of Life
  • Contention 2: Equity does not Promote Quality of Life
  • Case Study: Retirement Plans
  • Affirmative Notes
  • Negative Notes
Part III: Negative Cases
  • “Liberty and Justice for All”
  • Negative Case: Justice
  • Definitions
  • Value
  • Contention 1: How we lost the American Dream
  • Contention 2: How we can reclaim the American Dream
  • Conclusion
  • Negative Brief: Justice
  • “Freedom Needs a Kennel”
  • Negative Case: Social Good
  • Introduction
  • Value: Social Good
  • Reason to Prefer 1: Topic Context
  • Reason to Prefer 2: Foundational
  • Contention 1: Freedom harms Social Good
  • Sub-point A: Instability
  • Application: Bitcoin
  • Sub-point B: Misbehavior
  • Application: Black Wednesday
  • Contention 2: Equity builds Social Good
  • Conclusion
  • Negative Addendum: Social Good
  • Affirmative Brief: Social Good
  • “An Equal Slice”
  • Negative Case: Social Justice
  • Introduction:
  • Value: Social Justice
  • Criterion: Egalitarianism
  • Contention 1: Equity Leads to Social Justice
  • Contention 2: Social Justice Creates a Healthier Economy
  • Conclusion:
  • Affirmative Brief
  • Value:
  • Criterion:
  • Contention 1:
  • Contention 2:
  • “The Case for Sustainability”
  • Negative Case: Economic Sustainability
  • Introduction:
  • Value / Weighing Mechanism: Economic Sustainability
  • Contention 1: Freedom Self-Destructs
  • Contention 2: Equity Provides a Sustainable Framework
  • Conclusion:
  • Rebuttal Arguments
  • Definition of Freedom
  • Contention 2
  • “Same Difference”
  • Negative Case: Interdependent (Kritik)
  • Introduction:
  • Thesis: Freedom and Equity are Interdependent.
  • Contention I: Freedom Depends on Equity
  • Contention II: Equity Depends on Freedom.
  • Conclusion: Freedom cannot be Valued above Equity
  • Affirmative Brief

History of This Resolution

The cover photo this resolution was taken during a cross-examination scrimmage at the 2014 NCFCA National Tournament at Patrick Henry College. On the left is Caleb Scott (Region 4) and on the right is Braden Harm (Region 5). The National Tournament for this edition was held at Northwestern College in St. Paul, June 2015.